June 21, 2024
Army Medicine leaders talk information technology at DHITS | Article

Army Medicine leaders talk information technology at DHITS | Article








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Maj. Gen. Michael Place, MEDCOM Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General (Support) speaks at the Army Service Day session at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium Aug. 7 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
(Photo Credit: Joseph Kumzak)

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Maj. Gen. Michael Place, MEDCOM Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General (Support), participates in a joint-leadership roundtable discussion at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium Aug. 8 in New Orleans, Louisiana.








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Maj. Gen. Michael Place, MEDCOM Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General (Support), participates in a joint-leadership roundtable discussion at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium Aug. 8 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
(Photo Credit: Joseph Kumzak)

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Maj. Gen. Michael Place, MEDCOM Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General (Support), participates in a joint-leadership roundtable discussion at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium Aug. 8 in New Orleans, Louisiana.








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Maj. Gen. Michael Place, MEDCOM Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General (Support), participates in a joint-leadership roundtable discussion at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium Aug. 8 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
(Photo Credit: Joseph Kumzak)

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NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (August 8, 2023) — Army Medicine leaders joined military medical professionals at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium in New Orleans to discuss the future of military medicine and the next generation of healthcare.

Maj. Gen. Michael Place, Chief of Staff and Deputy Commanding General, Support, delivered a keynote speech on current and future technologies being implemented to improve healthcare delivery and build the Army of 2030 and beyond.

Place said technology is important for strategic advantage on the battlefield, but Soldiers are the most important component to winning wars.

“The combat Soldier is the most critical weapon system in our arsenal and the combat medic is the most critical medical system,” Place said.

He added, “The technology can enable you to win, but it’s going to be people — it’s going to be Soldiers in the mud that are doing tasks that only people can do — making decisions, anticipating, and understanding how to influence other people – that’s what war is all about.”

Col. James Jones, Director of Medical Capability Development and Integration Directorate, highlighted the importance of communications between services and allies.

“The ability to jointly communicate is the most critical aspect of the future battle space, and being able to bring in our joint-allied teammates is going to be crucial,” Jones said. “It’s important that medical assets are collaborating to ensure the role 2 and role 3 capabilities are understood, and where they’re located at, so we can share resources.”

During a joint-leadership roundtable, Place spoke on the critical role of interservice collaboration to strengthen medical force readiness across the Armed Forces.

“We are together the MHS and we form the DHA, so we need to embrace that and stop looking at the things that are slightly off,” Place said “We deliver healthcare to the best patients on the globe. We make a difference to our nation and to the globe – that’s what’s important.”

Place said in an interview that the future of information technology affects everyone in military medicine, e.g., doctors, nurses, and Medical Service Corps officers.

“This is not just a 70 Delta IT Specialist kind of thing. This is for all of us because this is the future of war,” He said. “The future of conflict is going to be data. We’re going to use it as ammunition, and we’re going to be able to use it as a weapon system.”

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